Power, Race, & Priviledge Symposium

Power, Race, & Priviledge Symposium

Power, Race, & Priviledge Symposium

Speakers

Smiling white women, middle age, wearing glasses, a purple shirt and purple hat in front of a backdrop of foliage.

Julia Serano

Julia Serano

Julia Serano is an Oakland, California-based writer, spoken word performer, musician, biologist, and activist. She is best known for her 2007 book Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity—The Advocate placed the book on their list of “Best Non-Fiction Transgender Books,” and readers of Ms. Magazine ranked it #16 on their list of the “100 Best Non-Fiction Books of All Time.” Her other books include 2013’s Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive (which was a finalist for the Judy Grahn Award for Lesbian Nonfiction) and 2016’s Outspoken: A Decade of Transgender Activism and Trans Feminism (which was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award for Transgender Nonfiction). Julia’s other writings have appeared in over a dozen anthologies, and in magazines and news outlets such as TIME, The Guardian, Salon, The Daily Beast, Bitch, AlterNet, Out, and Ms. Julia’s life experiences as a trans woman, and her understanding of biology (she has a PhD in Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics from Columbia University, and spent seventeen years as a researcher at UC Berkeley in the fields of genetics, evolution and developmental biology), gives her a unique perspective on gender and sexuality, and her writings have been used as teaching materials in gender studies, queer/LGBTQ studies, anthropology, sociology, psychology, and human sexuality courses across North America. Julia additionally writes silly, surreal, sex-positive fiction under the pen name Kat Cataclysm, and records indie-pop music under the moniker Soft Vowel Sounds. Information about her various creative endeavors can be found at juliaserano.com.

Julia Serano is an Oakland, California-based writer, spoken word performer, musician, biologist, and activist. She is best known for her 2007 book Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity—The Advocate placed the book on their list of “Best Non-Fiction Transgender Books,” and readers of Ms. Magazine ranked it #16 on their list of the “100 Best Non-Fiction Books of All Time.” Her other books include 2013’s Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive (which was a finalist for the Judy Grahn Award for Lesbian Nonfiction) and 2016’s Outspoken: A Decade of Transgender Activism and Trans Feminism (which was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award for Transgender Nonfiction). Julia’s other writings have appeared in over a dozen anthologies, and in magazines and news outlets such as TIME, The Guardian, Salon, The Daily Beast, Bitch, AlterNet, Out, and Ms. 

Jules headshot

In 2018, her first book of poetry Unearthing Secrets, Gathering Truths was published with Kegedonce Press, and she was also a selected filmmaker for the TIFF Filmmakers Lab. Jules is currently writing her first novel Moccasin Souls and is aiming to defend her PhD thesis in the fall of 2019. She carries extensive knowledge working in Indigenous community in several different capacities and these community experiences continue to feed her advocacy and her arts practice.

Born in Moose Factory Ontario, Jules was raised by her Cree speaking grandparents in Moosonee, and also with her mother in Ottawa, a warrior of the Canadian Residential school system.  Jules is a band member of Attawapiskat First Nation, the ancestral lands of the MoshKeKo InNiNeWak. She currently resides in Vancouver where she is  a PhD candidate with the Institute of Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia, her research focus is Indigenous documentary. In 2010, she completed her masters at Ryerson University in Documentary Media where she was awarded the Award of Distinction for her thesis work, as well as the Graduate Ryerson Gold Medal for highest academic achievement.  While in graduate school, she produced her first feature documentary film Remembering Inninimowin regarding her journey of remembering Cree.  After graduation, Jules was one of six women selected for the Women in the Directors Chair program at the Banff Center, where she directed a scene from her feature script Broken Angel, which is currently in development. Jules’ television series AskiBOYZ (2016) co-produced with Big Soul Production is now being aired on Aboriginal Peoples Television Network.
 
Jules’ company VisJuelles Productions Inc. has a number of films and other media works in development. In 2017, she released her short documentary NiiSoTeWak and her second CBC short OshKiKiShiKaw: A New Day was released in early 2019.  In 2017, she released a short
documentary Butterfly Monument about her relation, the late Shannen Koostachin with co-director/producer Rick Miller.   Jules was the 2017 Aboriginal Storyteller in Residence with the Vancouver Public Library where she further developed her poetry.  In the fall of 2018, Jules latest narrative film OChiSkwaCho premiered at ImagineNative Film Festival, and she is also in development with two (2) television series.  Jules has recently delved back into the world of performance art, currently represented by The Characters Talent Agency in Vancouver, and she is working on an animation series. 

After graduation, Jules was one of six women selected for the Women in the Directors Chair program at the Banff Center, where she directed a scene from her feature script Broken Angel, which is currently in development. Jules’ television series AskiBOYZ (2016) co-produced with Big Soul Production is now being aired on Aboriginal Peoples Television Network.
 
Jules’ company VisJuelles Productions Inc. has a number of films and other media works in development. In 2017, she released her short documentary NiiSoTeWak and her second CBC short OshKiKiShiKaw: A New Day was released in early 2019.  In 2017, she released a short
documentary Butterfly Monument about her relation, the late Shannen Koostachin with co-director/producer Rick Miller.   Jules was the 2017 Aboriginal Storyteller in Residence with the Vancouver Public Library where she further developed her poetry.  In the fall of 2018, Jules latest narrative film OChiSkwaCho premiered at ImagineNative Film Festival, and she is also in development with two (2) television series.  Jules has recently delved back into the world of performance art, currently represented by The Characters Talent Agency in Vancouver, and she
is working on an animation series. 

In 2018, her first book of poetry Unearthing Secrets, Gathering Truths was published with Kegedonce Press, and she was also a selected filmmaker for the TIFF Filmmakers Lab. Jules is currently writing her first novel Moccasin Souls and is aiming to defend her PhD thesis in the fall of 2019. She carries extensive knowledge working in Indigenous community in several different capacities and these community experiences continue to feed her advocacy and her arts practice.

 In 2018, her first book of poetry Unearthing Secrets, Gathering Truths was published with Kegedonce Press, and she was also a selected filmmaker for the TIFF Filmmakers Lab. Jules is currently writing her first novel Moccasin Souls and is aiming to defend her PhD thesis in the fall of 2019. She carries extensive knowledge working in Indigenous community in several different capacities and these community experiences continue to feed her advocacy and her arts practice.

Jules Arita Kootsachin

Jules Arita Kootsachin

Born in Moose Factory Ontario, Jules was raised by her Cree speaking grandparents in Moosonee, and also with her mother in Ottawa, a warrior of the Canadian Residential school system.  Jules is a band member of Attawapiskat First Nation, the ancestral lands of the MoshKeKo InNiNeWak. She currently resides in Vancouver where she is  a PhD candidate with the Institute of Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia, her research focus is Indigenous documentary. In 2010, she completed her masters at Ryerson University in Documentary Media where she was awarded the Award of Distinction for her thesis work, as well as the Graduate Ryerson Gold Medal for highest academic achievement.  While in graduate school, she produced her first feature documentary film Remembering Inninimowin regarding her journey of remembering Cree.  After graduation, Jules was one of six women selected for the Women in the Directors Chair program at the Banff Center, where she directed a scene from her feature script Broken Angel, which is currently in development. Jules’ television series AskiBOYZ (2016) co-produced with Big Soul Production is now being aired on Aboriginal Peoples Television Network.
 
Jules’ company VisJuelles Productions Inc. has a number of films and other media works in development. In 2017, she released her short documentary NiiSoTeWak and her second CBC short OshKiKiShiKaw: A New Day was released in early 2019.  In 2017, she released a short
documentary Butterfly Monument about her relation, the late Shannen Koostachin with co-director/producer Rick Miller.   Jules was the 2017 Aboriginal Storyteller in Residence with the Vancouver Public Library where she further developed her poetry.  In the fall of 2018, Jules latest narrative film OChiSkwaCho premiered at ImagineNative Film Festival, and she is also in development with two (2) television series.  Jules has recently delved back into the world of performance art, currently represented by The Characters Talent Agency in Vancouver, and she
is working on an animation series. 

Born in Moose Factory Ontario, Jules was raised by her Cree speaking grandparents in Moosonee, and also with her mother in Ottawa, a warrior of the Canadian Residential school system.  Jules is a band member of Attawapiskat First Nation, the ancestral lands of the MoshKeKo InNiNeWak. She currently resides in Vancouver where she is  a PhD candidate with the Institute of Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia, her research focus is Indigenous documentary. In 2010, she completed her masters at Ryerson University in Documentary Media where she was awarded the Award of Distinction for her thesis work, as well as the Graduate Ryerson Gold Medal for highest academic achievement.  While in graduate school, she produced her first feature documentary film Remembering Inninimowin regarding her journey of remembering Cree.  After graduation, Jules was one of six women selected for the Women in the Directors Chair program at the Banff Center, where she directed a scene from her feature script Broken Angel, which is currently in development. Jules’ television series AskiBOYZ (2016) co-produced with Big Soul Production is now being aired on Aboriginal Peoples Television Network.
 
Jules’ company VisJuelles Productions Inc. has a number of films and other media works in development. In 2017, she released her short documentary NiiSoTeWak and her second CBC short OshKiKiShiKaw: A New Day was released in early 2019.  In 2017, she released a short
documentary Butterfly Monument about her relation, the late Shannen Koostachin with co-director/producer Rick Miller.   Jules was the 2017 Aboriginal Storyteller in Residence with the Vancouver Public Library where she further developed her poetry.  In the fall of 2018, Jules latest narrative film OChiSkwaCho premiered at ImagineNative Film Festival, and she is also in development with two (2) television series.  Jules has recently delved back into the world of performance art, currently represented by The Characters Talent Agency in Vancouver, and she is working on an animation series. 

Born in Moose Factory Ontario, Jules was raised by her Cree speaking grandparents in Moosonee, and also with her mother in Ottawa, a warrior of the Canadian Residential school system.  Jules is a band member of Attawapiskat First Nation, the ancestral lands of the MoshKeKo InNiNeWak. She currently resides in Vancouver where she is  a PhD candidate with the Institute of Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia, her research focus is Indigenous documentary. In 2010, she completed her masters at Ryerson University in Documentary Media where she was awarded the Award of Distinction for her thesis work, as well as the Graduate Ryerson Gold Medal for highest academic achievement.  While in graduate school, she produced her first feature documentary film Remembering Inninimowin regarding her journey of remembering Cree.  

Born in Moose Factory Ontario, Jules was raised by her Cree speaking grandparents in Moosonee, and also with her mother in Ottawa, a warrior of the Canadian Residential school system.  Jules is a band member of Attawapiskat First Nation, the ancestral lands of the MoshKeKo InNiNeWak. She currently resides in Vancouver where she is  a PhD candidate with the Institute of Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Social Justice at the University of British Columbia, her research focus is Indigenous documentary. In 2010, she completed her masters at Ryerson University in Documentary Media where she was awarded the Award of Distinction for her thesis work, as well as the Graduate Ryerson Gold Medal for highest academic achievement.  While in graduate school, she produced her first feature documentary film Remembering Inninimowin regarding her journey of remembering Cree.  After graduation, Jules was one of six women selected for the Women in the Directors Chair program at the Banff Center, where she directed a scene from her feature script Broken Angel, which is currently in development. Jules’ television series AskiBOYZ (2016) co-produced with Big Soul Production is now being aired on Aboriginal Peoples Television Network.
 
Jules’ company VisJuelles Productions Inc. has a number of films and other media works in development. In 2017, she released her short documentary NiiSoTeWak and her second CBC short OshKiKiShiKaw: A New Day was released in early 2019.  In 2017, she released a short
documentary Butterfly Monument about her relation, the late Shannen Koostachin with co-director/producer Rick Miller.   Jules was the 2017 Aboriginal Storyteller in Residence with the Vancouver Public Library where she further developed her poetry.  In the fall of 2018, Jules latest narrative film OChiSkwaCho premiered at ImagineNative Film Festival, and she is also in development with two (2) television series.  Jules has recently delved back into the world of performance art, currently represented by The Characters Talent Agency in Vancouver, and she is working on an animation series. 

peter headshot

Peter Wanyenya

Peter Wanyenya is a “son of the soil” with roots in eastern Africa. He also calls Toronto, Ontario home and serves as the program advisor for over 90 undergraduate scholars in the University of British Columbia (UBC) International Scholars Programs. He also provides support to the UBC World University Service of Canada Local Committee and Student Refugee Program. Peter also co-manages the UBC Really? Campaign, which promotes intercultural understanding and respect for diversity on campus. 

Peter Wanyenya is a “son of the soil” with roots in eastern Africa. He also calls Toronto, Ontario home and serves as the program advisor for over 90 undergraduate scholars in the University of British Columbia (UBC) International Scholars Programs. He also provides support to the UBC World University Service of Canada Local Committee and Student Refugee Program. Peter also co-manages the UBC Really? Campaign, which promotes intercultural understanding and respect for diversity on campus. 

Peter is driven by core values of equity, diversity, and intercultural understanding. He is particularly invested in initiatives that foster the wellbeing of children and youth, and leverage their potential. Drawing from his deep commitment and passion for positive social change Peter is a national policy working group member of the National Alliance for Children and Youth and has recently completed a one-year term as co-program coordinator for the B.C. Society for Intercultural Education, Training, and Research. He continues his community engagement as a Board Director for the Access to Media Education Society where he was an active program participant in an art-based media education and community engagement program for marginalized youth and through the organisation coordinated the BC-wide anti-oppression project for children and youth in elementary and secondary schools. Peter is also a Board Director for Kick Starts Arts, a non-profit Arts and Education organisation.

Prior to his current engagements he was actively involved in access to education advocacy for low-income youth and served as an “at-risk” children and youth worker in multiple inner city communities in Toronto, and led educational programming for Indigenous children at UBC and at the Musqueam Nation village.

Yin Xzi Ho

Yin Xzi Ho photo

Yin Xzi is a second year student at Quest University Canada. Growing up, she spent half her life in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and the other half in Guangzhou, China, before moving to Squamish, British Columbia. Despite being physically oriented in the geographies of East/Southeast Asia, she has been largely influenced by the ideologies of the West through books and films. The complexities and contradictions that come from this have led to her Question: "Do I belong?", which explores how the study of/viewing of/production of art (all expressive mediums) is implicit in, and can transform our representations and conceptualizations of belonging (defined both by place and social narratives).

Kunjika Pathak

kunjika headshot

Kunjika is a second year exchange student at Quest University Canada and she comes from FLAME University, India. Her major is Literary and Cultural Studies and minor is International Studies. Her major and minor combination has piqued her interest in cultural meanings and their production. Her interaction with cultural materials spans across several fields such as performing arts, literature, political science and food anthropology. Through reading across disciplines she is largely grappling with the idea of identity. She is interested in studying structures of power that manifest themselves through race, caste, gender and sexuality. She loves telling stories and her favourite stories involve talking about food.